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East Bay MPX updates

December 2022

  • MPX cases have continued to decline from a peak in July/August in Alameda County, Contra Costa County, California and nationwide. Increasing vaccine coverage and rapid access to diagnosis and treatment continues to be crucial.
  • Free MPX vaccines are still available in Alameda County and Contra Costa County, including 2nd doses. Walk-ins are welcome!
    • Anyone who requests the MPX vaccine should receive it. On December 9, ACPHD sent a health alert stating: “providers should offer JYNNEOS vaccine to ANY person who may be at risk or believes they may be at risk, and ANY person who requests vaccination should receive it. Providers should not require that a person share a reason for wanting vaccination.”
    • More effort is needed to provide vaccine to: all people living with HIV, MSM, transgender people, people w/multiple sex partners and lab/health care workers with exposures, especially people who are Black/African American and/or Latinx.
  • Asymptomatic transmission of MPX: A large UK MPX study of 2,746 people with MPX found that a large proportion of MPX infection transmissions occurred as many as 4 days before symptoms started. The researchers concluded that an isolation period of 16-23 days after exposure would be required to detect 95% of people with potential infection. This study underscores the difficulty of identifying infections before they spread and the importance of maximizing vaccine coverage. 
  • TPOXX (tecovirimat) treatment for severe and/or high-risk MPX illness is available.
    • People at high risk include those with weakened immune systems (such as HIV not virally suppressed and/or CD4 <200) and skin conditions (such as eczema).
    • Severe disease includes a large number of lesions, involvement of body parts which might result in scarring or strictures, and serious systemic illness such as sepsis, encephalitis and bleeding.
    • A CDC study found that in a group of people with MPX, most of the people hospitalized for severe MPX were Black/African American cismen living with HIV and had CD4<200. They experienced had delays in diagnosis and treatment. 12 of the 57 in this group died. This study underscores the importance of MPX vaccination, rapid diagnosis and treatment with TPOXX ASAP for all people with severe MPX symptoms and all people living with HIV with CD4<200.
    • In Alameda County, TPOXX may be available at your clinic’s pharmacy, the EBAC pharmacy and through the Summit Emergency Department.
    • In Contra Costa County, TPOXX is available through the county for people with Medi-Cal and no insurance (call 887-661-6230) or through the BASS ID group for people with Medicare and private insurance (call 925-947-2334). 
  • Don’t forget other STIs:
    • Get screened right away for MPX along with other STIs and illnesses if you have symptoms, especially when a rash or other symptoms are not getting better. 
    • A recent study found that 38% of people with MPX had HIV, and 41% had an STI in the preceding year.

How MPX spreads and how to prevent it

Click here for photos of MPX skin rashes (goes to CDC website).


MPX vaccine updates

The Jynneos vaccine is a live attenuated virus that is considered safe and effective at preventing the onset of disease and severity of illness due to the MPX virus. It is most effective as prevention and within 4 days of exposure but can be given 4-14 days after exposure to help decrease disease severity. Full vaccination requires 2 doses at least 28 days apart and a person is not considered fully vaccinated until 2 weeks after their second dose. Although a 28-day interval is optimal, there is no need to restart or add doses to the vaccine series if the second dose is given after 28 days. As of September 2022, there is adequate supply of the vaccine in the East Bay to give second doses.

Where to get the vaccine in Alameda County:

Oakland LGBTQ Center: Men who have sex with men (MSM), gay men, bisexual men, pansexual men, transgender and GNC individuals, and sex workers are encouraged to get vaccinated: Please click for more information and click here for vax registration.  

  • Schedule: Walk-ins and appointments for Monkeypox vaccinations will be held weekly on Tuesdays 11-4 pm except for December 27. Please call 510-781-2639 for more info.
  • Location: Directly across from the Oakland LGBTQ Center and the T-Mobile store, at the corner of Lakeshore and Lakeside, beneath the 580 overpass at 533 Lake Park Ave.

Steamworks: Steamworks in Berkeley is offering Monkeypox vaccine pop-up clinics for those who are eligible. Please check their Instagram account here.

Kaiser: Kaiser members who are Alameda County residents who get their care at the Oakland Medical Center can call 510-225-8233.  Kaiser members who get their care at Kaiser Fremont and San Leandro can call 510-454-2780.

Asian Health Services: AHS is offering monkeypox vaccine on:

  • Mondays from 10 – 12PM: Clinton Park, 655 International Blvd., Oakland, CA 94606
  • Fridays from 10 – 12PM: Madison Park, 810 Jackson St., Oakland, CA 94607

Other potential vaccine options: please contact your healthcare provider or occupational health department if you are eligible for the monkeypox vaccine. If you do not have a healthcare provider, please contact monkeypox@acgov.org

Who is eligible in Alameda County:

ACPHD has expanded JYNNEOS vaccine access to include populations who may benefit from pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) as well as post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP). In Alameda County, although 40% of persons with MPX are Latinx and 25% are Black/African American, only 19% of vaccine recipients are Latinx and 12% Black/African American. It is crucial that we ensure outreach and access for communities of color.

ACPHD recommends intradermal administration as the preferred route of administration of JYNNEOS vaccine. This allows more vaccine doses to be given per vial. Vaccination sites run by Alameda County staff and contractors will allow all minors 12 to 17 years of age to receive the JYNNEOS vaccine without parent/guardian consent.

Individuals who meet any one of the following criteria are eligible for the JYNNEOS vaccine in Alameda County:

  • Gay and bisexual men and their sex partners
  • Transgender people and their sex partners
  • Sex workers and their sex partners
  • People with multiple sex partners
  • People living with HIV
  • People who had sex at any sex venue
  • Healthcare workers who are likely to collect laboratory specimens from persons with MPX (e.g., persons working in sexual health clinics or clinical settings that serve at risk populations)
  • Laboratory workers who perform MPX testing

Second Doses of JYNNEOS

  • Second doses of JYNNEOS vaccine should be administered to anyone who received a first dose at least 28 days prior. Although a 28-day interval is optimal, there is no need to restart or add doses to the vaccine series if the second dose is given after 28 days.
  • Persons with moderate to severe immunosuppression should receive their second dose no later than 35 days after their first dose.
  • Persons 18 and older who received their first dose subcutaneously may receive a second dose intradermally.
  • Persons diagnosed with MPX after their first dose are not recommended to receive the second dose (unless they are immunocompromised), because MPX infection likely confers additional immune protection.

Where to get the vaccine in Contra Costa County:

In Contra Costa County, walk-in or schedule your MPX vaccine appointment at locations listed here or call 1-833-829-2626.

Second doses of MPX vaccine are available to individuals if it has at least been 28 days since someone got the first dose.

Ongoing vaccine clinics via Contra Costa Health Services:

  • Concord Monument at 1034 Oak Grove Rd, Concord
    • Every Tuesday: 12-3:30PM & 4:30-7PM
  • Richmond Auditorium at 403 Civic Ctr Plaza, Richmond
    • Every Wednesday – Saturday: 8-12PM & 12:30-3PM

Who is eligible in Contra Costa County

Contra Costa Health (CCH) prioritizes vaccine for community members who have potential exposures to someone with MPX virus or are at high risk of exposure to MPX virus, including:

  • Any man or trans person who has sex with men or trans people.
  • People who engage in sex work.
  • Persons who had close contact with someone with suspected or confirmed monkeypox.
  • Sexually active persons living with HIV or AIDS.
  • People taking or prescribed HIV Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP).
  • People who have been diagnosed with syphilis or gonorrhea infection in the past 12 months.
  • People who have had any of the following in the past 6 months: Sex at a commercial sex venue (like a sex club or bathhouse)
  • Sex at an event, venue, or in an area where monkeypox transmission is occurring
  • People whose sexual partner identifies with any of the above scenarios.
  • Anyone who anticipates experiencing any of the above scenarios.

CCH recommends that anyone who has had a potential exposure to MPX or meets one or more of the criteria above get vaccinated.


Alameda County MPX updates

From the October 14, 2022 ACPHD MPX Health Advisory:

Monkeypox (MPX) virus transmission continues in the Bay Area. Although anyone can acquire MPX, most local cases reported to date are among gay and bisexual men and other men who have sex with men. Additional background information regarding MPX can be found in the resources listed at the bottom of this advisory. Although MPX cases in Alameda County are decreasing, healthcare providers should continue to be vigilant for new cases and reach eligible persons for vaccine. Even after the current outbreak ends, future clusters of cases should be anticipated.

Contra Costa County MPX Updates

Contra Costa Health Services, along with the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) and other agencies, are monitoring a growing outbreak of monkeypox cases in the United States and California. Visit the CDPH monkeypox tracking page f​or the latest information about confirmed or suspected cases of monkeypox in the county.

MPX data dashboards: Alameda County | Contra Costa County | California | United States


MPX treatment updates

Most MPX infections are mild and will heal without treatment.

TPOXX (tecovirimat) treatment for severe and/or high-risk MPX illness is available.

  • People at high risk include those with HIV not virally suppressed and/or CD4<200, other immunocompromising conditions, skin conditions (such as eczema), children under 8 years of age, and people who are pregnant or breastfeeding.
  • Severe disease includes a large number of lesions, involvement of anatomic areas (such as eyes or genitals) which might result in serious sequelae that includes scarring or strictures, and serious systemic illness such as sepsis, encephalitis and bleeding.
  • If you have MPX and want treatment but don’t have a medical provider and/or want to participate in a research study, please consider enrolling in the STOMP study at UCSF (call 415-535-9495).
  • Clinicians: please see the CDC TPOXX treatment guide and TPOXX investigational new drug (IND) protocol here.
  • In Alameda County, TPOXX may be available at your clinic’s pharmacy, the EBAC pharmacy and through the Summit Emergency Department.
  • In Contra Costa County, TPOXX is available through the county for people with Medi-Cal and no insurance (call 887-661-6230) or through the BASS ID group for people with Medicare and private insurance (call 925-947-2334). 

Resources for community members and organizations:

Alameda County Public Health Department: Information on Monkeypox

Alameda County Public Health Department: Clinical Guidance on Monkeypox

What is monkeypox?
¿Qué es la viruela del mono?

Communications resources and toolkits: